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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:林星宇 大小:xcjQUvsa82825KB 下载:AfWDgGIc90877次
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日期:2020-08-07 03:26:19
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "The man who had seduced her then said, 'Would you like to comealong with us to see the house of your parents and your parentsthemselves? They are both alive and are said to be well off.'
2.  "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'
3.  Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."
4.  At last, however, Ulysses said, "Wife, we have not yet reached theend of our troubles. I have an unknown amount of toil still toundergo. It is long and difficult, but I must go through with it,for thus the shade of Teiresias prophesied concerning me, on the daywhen I went down into Hades to ask about my return and that of mycompanions. But now let us go to bed, that we may lie down and enjoythe blessed boon of sleep."
5.  "He would not answer, but turned away to Erebus and to the otherghosts; nevertheless, I should have made him talk to me in spite ofhis being so angry, or I should have gone talking to him, only thatthere were still others among the dead whom I desired to see.
6.  "I went on board, bidding my men to do so also and loose thehawsers; so they took their places and smote the grey sea with theiroars. When we got to the land, which was not far, there, on the faceof a cliff near the sea, we saw a great cave overhung with laurels. Itwas a station for a great many sheep and goats, and outside therewas a large yard, with a high wall round it made of stones builtinto the ground and of trees both pine and oak. This was the abodeof a huge monster who was then away from home shepherding hisflocks. He would have nothing to do with other people, but led thelife of an outlaw. He was a horrid creature, not like a human being atall, but resembling rather some crag that stands out boldly againstthe sky on the top of a high mountain.

计划指导

1.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, how can I drive the mother whobore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not knowwhether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to payIcarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending hisdaughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, butheaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the housewill calf on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be acreditable thing to do, and I will have nothing to say to it. If youchoose to take offence at this, leave the house and feast elsewhere atone another's houses at your own cost turn and turn about. If, onthe other hand, you elect to persist in spunging upon one man,heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon with you in full, and when youfall in my father's house there shall be no man to avenge you."
2.  Thus did he speak, and his words set them all a weeping. Helen wept,Telemachus wept, and so did Menelaus, nor could Pisistratus keep hiseyes from filling, when he remembered his dear brother Antilochus whomthe son of bright Dawn had killed. Thereon he said to Menelaus,
3.  Thus did he speak. His hearers all of them approved his saying andagreed that he should have his escort inasmuch as he had spokenreasonably. Alcinous therefore said to his servant, "Pontonous, mixsome wine and hand it round to everybody, that we may offer a prayerto father Jove, and speed our guest upon his way."
4.  And the ghost of Amphimedon answered, "Agamemnon, son of Atreus,king of men, I remember everything that you have said, and will tellyou fully and accurately about the way in which our end was broughtabout. Ulysses had been long gone, and we were courting his wife,who did not say point blank that she would not marry, nor yet bringmatters to an end, for she meant to compass our destruction: this,then, was the trick she played us. She set up a great tambour frame inher room and began to work on an enormous piece of fine needlework.'Sweethearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeed dead, still, do notpress me to marry again immediately; wait- for I would not have myskill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I have completed a pallfor the hero Laertes, against the time when death shall take him. Heis very rich, and the women of the place will talk if he is laid outwithout a pall.' This is what she said, and we assented; whereuponwe could see her working upon her great web all day long, but at nightshe would unpick the stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us inthis way for three years without our finding it out, but as timewore on and she was now in her fourth year, in the waning of moons andmany days had been accomplished, one of her maids who knew what shewas doing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work,so she had to finish it whether she would or no; and when she showedus the robe she had made, after she had had it washed, its splendourwas as that of the sun or moon.
5.  Irus began to be very uneasy as he heard them, but the servantsgirded him by force, and brought him [into the open part of the court]in such a fright that his limbs were all of a tremble. Antinousscolded him and said, "You swaggering bully, you ought never to havebeen born at all if you are afraid of such an old broken-down creatureas this tramp is. I say, therefore- and it shall surely be- if hebeats you and proves himself the better man, I shall pack you off onboard ship to the mainland and send you to king Echetus, who killsevery one that comes near him. He will cut off your nose and ears, anddraw out your entrails for the dogs to eat."
6.  "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."

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1.  "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:
2.  But she would not give him full victory as yet, for she wished stillfurther to prove his own prowess and that of his brave son, so sheflew up to one of the rafters in the roof of the cloister and sat uponit in the form of a swallow.
3.  "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."
4.  Ulysses answered, "Laodamas, why do you taunt me in this way? mymind is set rather on cares than contests; I have been throughinfinite trouble, and am come among you now as a suppliant, prayingyour king and people to further me on my return home."
5.   "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.
6.  As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:

应用

1.  Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.
2.  Then Melanthius the goatherd answered, "You ill-conditioned cur,what are you talking about? Some day or other I will put you onboard ship and take you to a foreign country, where I can sell you andpocket the money you will fetch. I wish I were as sure that Apollowould strike Telemachus dead this very day, or that the suitorswould kill him, as I am that Ulysses will never come home again."
3.  "The man who had seduced her then said, 'Would you like to comealong with us to see the house of your parents and your parentsthemselves? They are both alive and are said to be well off.'
4、  "And the goddess answered, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, you shallnone of you stay here any longer if you do not want to, but there isanother journey which you have got to take before you can sailhomewards. You must go to the house of Hades and of dread Proserpineto consult the ghost of the blind Theban prophet Teiresias whosereason is still unshaken. To him alone has Proserpine left hisunderstanding even in death, but the other ghosts flit aboutaimlessly.'
5、  They did as they were told, and set food before Ulysses, who ate anddrank ravenously, for it was long since he had had food of any kind.Meanwhile, Nausicaa bethought her of another matter. She got the linenfolded and placed in the waggon, she then yoked the mules, and, as shetook her seat, she called Ulysses:

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  • 佘瞿 08-06

      But Penelope lay in her own room upstairs unable to eat or drink,and wondering whether her brave son would escape, or be overpowered bythe wicked suitors. Like a lioness caught in the toils with huntsmenhemming her in on every side she thought and thought till she sankinto a slumber, and lay on her bed bereft of thought and motion.

  • 马哲睿 08-06

      BOOK XVI.

  • 舒忠莲 08-06

       "I hope, sir," said he, "that you will not be offended with what Iam going to say. Singing comes cheap to those who do not pay for it,and all this is done at the cost of one whose bones lie rotting insome wilderness or grinding to powder in the surf. If these men wereto see my father come back to Ithaca they would pray for longer legsrather than a longer purse, for money would not serve them; but he,alas, has fallen on an ill fate, and even when people do sometimes saythat he is coming, we no longer heed them; we shall never see himagain. And now, sir, tell me and tell me true, who you are and whereyou come from. Tell me of your town and parents, what manner of shipyou came in, how your crew brought you to Ithaca, and of what nationthey declared themselves to be- for you cannot have come by land. Tellme also truly, for I want to know, are you a stranger to this house,or have you been here in my father's time? In the old days we had manyvisitors for my father went about much himself."

  • 林天真 08-06

      "Hear me, O King, whoever you may be, and save me from the angerof the sea-god Neptune, for I approach you prayerfully. Any one whohas lost his way has at all times a claim even upon the gods,wherefore in my distress I draw near to your stream, and cling tothe knees of your riverhood. Have mercy upon me, O king, for I declaremyself your suppliant."

  • 罗美薇 08-05

    {  On hearing this Telemachus smiled to his father, but so that Eumaeuscould not see him.

  • 姜宁 08-04

      "'My son,' she answered, 'most ill-fated of all mankind, it is notProserpine that is beguiling you, but all people are like this whenthey are dead. The sinews no longer hold the flesh and bones together;these perish in the fierceness of consuming fire as soon as life hasleft the body, and the soul flits away as though it were a dream. Now,however, go back to the light of day as soon as you can, and noteall these things that you may tell them to your wife hereafter.'}

  • 王晓山 08-04

      As he spoke he threw his shabby old tattered wallet over hisshoulders, by the cord from which it hung, and Eumaeus gave him astick to his liking. The two then started, leaving the station incharge of the dogs and herdsmen who remained behind; the swineherd ledthe way and his master followed after, looking like some broken-downold tramp as he leaned upon his staff, and his clothes were all inrags. When they had got over the rough steep ground and were nearingthe city, they reached the fountain from which the citizens drew theirwater. This had been made by Ithacus, Neritus, and Polyctor. There wasa grove of water-loving poplars planted in a circle all round it,and the clear cold water came down to it from a rock high up, whileabove the fountain there was an altar to the nymphs, at which allwayfarers used to sacrifice. Here Melanthius son of Dolius overtookthem as he was driving down some goats, the best in his flock, for thesuitors' dinner, and there were two shepherds with him. When he sawEumaeus and Ulysses he reviled them with outrageous and unseemlylanguage, which made Ulysses very angry.

  • 吉晓 08-04

      "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'

  • 徐顺利 08-03

       When Ulysses heard this he put the lid on the chest and made it fastwith a bond that Circe had taught him. He had done so before anupper servant told him to come to the bath and wash himself. He wasvery glad of a warm bath, for he had had no one to wait upon himever since he left the house of Calypso, who as long as he remainedwith her had taken as good care of him as though he had been a god.When the servants had done washing and anointing him with oil, and hadgiven him a clean cloak and shirt, he left the bath room and joinedthe guests who were sitting over their wine. Lovely Nausicaa stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof if the cloister, andadmired him as she saw him pass. "Farewell stranger," said she, "donot forget me when you are safe at home again, for it is to me firstthat you owe a ransom for having saved your life."

  • 李胜男 08-01

    {  Then the god stayed his stream and stilled the waves, making allcalm before him, and bringing him safely into the mouth of theriver. Here at last Ulysses' knees and strong hands failed him, forthe sea had completely broken him. His body was all swollen, and hismouth and nostrils ran down like a river with sea-water, so that hecould neither breathe nor speak, and lay swooning from sheerexhaustion; presently, when he had got his breath and came tohimself again, he took off the scarf that Ino had given him andthrew it back into the salt stream of the river, whereon Inoreceived it into her hands from the wave that bore it towards her.Then he left the river, laid himself down among the rushes, and kissedthe bounteous earth.

  • 丰禾 08-01

      Then Ulysses said, "Sir, I do not want to stay here; a beggar canalways do better in town than country, for any one who likes cangive him something. I am too old to care about remaining here at thebeck and call of a master. Therefore let this man do as you havejust told him, and take me to the town as soon as I have had a warm bythe fire, and the day has got a little heat in it. My clothes arewretchedly thin, and this frosty morning I shall be perished withcold, for you say the city is some way off."

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