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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:侯振国 大小:FZ3TtxR133196KB 下载:taAHFljW59960次
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日期:2020-08-05 08:28:40
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  A HAPPY AND SUCCESSEFULL DELIVERANCE
2.  This strange and uncouth sight, bred in him no meane admiration,as also kinde compassion to the unfortunate woman; out of whichcompassion, sprung an earnest desire, to deliver her (if he could)from a death so full of anguish and horror: but seeing himselfe tobe without Armes, he ran and pluckt up the plant of a Tree, whichhandling as if it had bene a staffe, he opposed himselfe against theDogges and the Knight, who seeing him comming, cryed out in thismanner to him. Anastasio, put not thy selfe in any opposition, butreferre to my Hounds and me, to punish this wicked woman as she hathjustly deserved. And in speaking these words, the Hounds tooke fasthold on her body, so staying her, untill the Knight was come neerer toher, and alighted from his horse: when Anastasio (after some otherangry speeches) spake thus unto him: I cannot tell what or who thouart, albeit thou takest such knowledge of me, yet I must say, thatit is meere cowardize in a Knight, being armed as thou art, to offerto kill a naked woman, and make thy dogges thus to seize on her, as ifshe were a savage beast; therefore beleeve me, I will defend her sofarre as I am able.
3.  Madam, I doe not remember, that ever I sustained any losse orhinderance by you, but rather so much good, as if I was worth anything, it proceeded from your great deservings, and by the servicein which I did stand engaged to you. But my present happinesse canno way be equalled, derived from your super-abounding gracious favour,and more then common course of kindnesse, vouchsafing (of your owneliberall nature) to come and visit so poore a servant. Oh that I hadas much to spend againe, as heretofore riotously I have runnethorow: what a welcome would your poore Host bestow upon you, forgracing; this homely house with your divine presence? With thesewordes, he conducted her into his house, and then into his simpleGarden, where having no convenient company for her, he said. Madam,the poverty of this place is such, that it affoordeth none fit foryour conversation: this poore woman, wife to an honest Husbandman willattend on you, while I (with some speede) shall make ready dinner.
4.  Calandrino hearing, that they all agreed in one opinion of him; hebeganne verily to perswade himselfe, that some sodaine sicknes, hadseised upon him, which they could discerne, although hee felt noanguish at all: and therefore, like a man much perplexed in minde,demanded of them, What he should do? Beleeve me Calandrino (answeredBruno) if I were worthy to give thee counsell, thou shouldst returnehome presently to thy house, and lay thee downe in thy warme Bedde,covered with so many cloathes as thou canst well endure. Then toMorrow morning, send thy Water unto Learned Mayster Doctor thePhysitian, who (as thou knowest) is a man of most singular skill andexperience: he will instruct thee presently what is the best course tobe taken, and we that have ever beene thy loving friends, will notfaile thee in any thing that lieth in our power.
5.  After that Madame Eliza had concluded her Novell, and every one ofthe company given thankes to Fortune, for delivering poore Isabellathe faire young Nunne, from the bitter reprehensions of the asfaulty Abbesse, as also the malice of her envious Sisters; theQueene gave command unto Philostratus, that he should be the next inorder, and hee (without expecting anie other warning) began in thismanner.
6.  Sir, replyed the Pilgrime, I desire nor demand any thing of you, butthat you would pardon the foure Brethren of Theobaldo, that broughtyou to this hard extremity, as thinking you to be guilty of theirbrothers death, and that you would also accept them as your brethrenand friends upon their craving pardon for what they have done.

计划指导

1.  In soule and spright
2.  Worthy Lady, it seemeth to me, that you are so truly wise, as nodoubt you have long since perceived, what unfeigned affection yourbeauty (far excelling) hath compelled me to beare you. Setting asidethose commendable qualities and singular vertues gloriously shining inyou, and powerfull enough to make a conquest of the stoutestcourage, I held it utterly needlesse, to let you understand bywords, how faithfull the love is I bear you, were it not much morefervent and constant, then ever any other man can expresse to a woman.In which condition it shall still continue, without the leastblemish or impayre, so long as I enjoy life or motion; yea, and I dareassure you, that if in the future world, affection may containe thesame powerfull dominion, as it doth in this; I am the man borne tolove you perpetually. Whereby you may rest confidently perswaded, thatyou enjoy not any thing, how poore or precious soever it be, which youcan so solemnely account to be your owne, and in the truest title ofright, as you may my selfe, in all that I have, or for ever shall bemine.
3.  This girl, a heathen in a place where many were Christian, usedoften to hear her neighbours extol the Christian faith and devotion tothe service of God; wherefore she asked one of them how God could bestbe served and with the least hindrance. She was told that they bestserved Him who removed themselves farthest from the things of theworld, as in particular the hermits who had withdrawn from the city tothe wilds of Thebais.
4.  "Modest shame makes me silent in my wealth and possessions, my mindetruely telling mee, that honest contented povertie, is the mostancient and richest inheritance, of our best and Noblest Romanes,which opinion, if it bee condemned by the understanding of theignorant multitude, and heerein wee shall give way to them bypreferring riches and worldly treasures, then I can say that I amaboundantly provided, not as ambitious, or greedily covetous, butsufficiently stored with the goods of Fortune.
5.  But truth lives not in men,
6.  For the losse of his beloved Angelina, he was the most wofull man inthe world, wandering one while this way, and then againe another,calling for her all about the Forrest, without any answere returningto him. And not daring to ride backe againe, on he travailed still,not knowing where to make his arrivall. And having formerly heard ofsavage ravenous beasts, which commonly live in such unfrequentedForrests: he not onely was in feare of loosing his owne life, but alsodespayred much for his Angelina, least some Lyon or Woolfe, hadtorne her body in peeces.

推荐功能

1.  The friendly Merchant, and likewise the Ladie, hearing thesewords, wept both bitterly: and after hee had given over speaking,kindely they comforted him, with promises and solemne Vowes, that ifhee dyed, all should be performed which hee had requested. Within ashort while after, he departed out of this life, and they gave himverie honourable buriall, according to that Country custome. Whichbeing done, the Merchant dispatching all his affaires at Rhodes, wasdesirous to returne home to Cyprus, in a Carracke of the Catelans thenthere being: mooving the Ladie in the matter, to understand how sheestoode enclined, because urgent occasions called him thence to Cyprus.The Lady made answere, that shee was willing to passe thither withhim, hoping for the love hee bare to deceased Antiochus, that heewould respect her as his Sister. The Merchant was willing to giveher any contentment, but yet resolved her, that under the title ofbeing his Sister, it would be no warrant of securitie to them both.Wherefore, hee rather advised her, to stile him as her husband, and hewould terme her his Wife, and so hee should be sure to defend her fromall injuries whatsoever.
2.  It is a matter most convenient (deare Ladies) that a man ought tobegin whatsoever he doth, in the great and glorious name of him, whowas the Creator of all things. Wherefore, seeing that I am the manappointed, to begin this your invention of discoursing Novelties: Iintend to begin also with one of his wonderfull workes. To the end,that this being heard, our hope may remaine on him, as the thing onelypermanent, and his name for ever to be praised by us. Now, as there isnothing more certaine, but that even as temporall things are mortalland transitory, so are they both in and out of themselves, full ofsorrow, paine, and anguish, and subjected to infinite dangers: So inthe same manner, we live mingled among them, seeming as part ofthem, and cannot (without some error) continue or defend our selves,if God by his especiall grace and favour, give us not strength andgood understanding. Which power we may not beleeve, that either itdescendeth to us, or liveth in us, by any merites of our owne; butof his onely most gracious benignity. Mooved neverthelesse andentreated by the intercessions of them, who were (as we are)mortals; and having diligently observed his commandements, are nowwith him in eternall blessednes. To whom (as to advocates andprocurators, informed by the experience of our frailty) wee are not topresent our prayers in the presence of so great a Judge; but onelyto himselfe, for the obtaining of all such things as his wisedomeknoweth to be most expedient for us. And well may we credit, thathis goodnesse is more fully enclined towards us, in his continuallbounty and liberality; then the subtilty of mortall eye, can reachinto the secret of so divine a thought: and sometimes therefore we maybe beguiled in opinion, by electing such and such as our intercessorsbefore his high Majesty, who perhaps are farre off from him, or driveninto perpetuall exile, as unworthy to appeare in so glorious apresence. For he, from whom nothing can be hidden, more regardeththe sincerity of him that prayeth, then ignorant devotion, committedto the trust of a heedlesse intercessor; and such prayers have alwaiesgracious acceptation in his sight. As manifestly will appeare, bythe Novell which I intend to relate; manifestly (I say) not as inthe judgement of God, but according to the apprehension of men.
3.  OVER-LIGHT BELEEFE
4.  So soone as Madam Flammetta had ended her Song; Dioneus, who sate byher, smiling said. Truly Madam, you may do us a great courtesie, toexpresse your selfe more plainly to us all, least (thorow ignorance)the possession may be imposed on your selfe, and so you remaine themore offended.
5.   In the morning, when the King was risen, he gave command that beforethe Pallace gates were opened, all his whole Family should come beforehim, as instantly his will was fulfilled. Standing all uncovered inhis presence, he began to consider with himselfe, which of them wasthe man that he had marked. And seeing the most part of them to havetheir lockes cut, all after one and the selfe same manner;marvailing greatly, he saide to himselfe. The man whom I seeke for,though he be but of meane and base condition, yet it plainelyappeareth, that he is of no deject or common understanding. Andseeing, that without further clamour and noyse, he could not findout the party he looked for, he concluded, not to win eternallshame, by compassing a poore revenge: but rather (by way ofadmonition) to let the offender know in a word, that he was both notedand observed. So turning to them all, he saide; He that hath doneit, let him be silent, and doe so no more, and now depart about yourbusinesse.
6.  Among us women, this day, I thinke few or none have thereinoffended, but as readily have understood short and pithy speeches, asthey have beene quicke and quaintly delivered. But when answeringsuteth not with understanding, it is generally a shame in us, and allsuch as live; because our moderne times have converted that vertue,which was within them who lived before us, into garments of the body,and shew whose habites were noted to bee most gaudy, fullest ofimbroyderies and fantastick fashions: she was reputed to have mostmatter in her, and therefore to be more honoured and esteemed. Neverconsidering, that whosoever loadeth the backe of an Asse, or puts uponhim the richest braverie; he becommeth not thereby a jot the wiser, ormeriteth any more honor then an Asse should have. I am ashamed tospeake it, because in detecting other, I may (perhaps) as justly taxemy selfe.

应用

1.  Bruno being gone to the Physitian, he made such expedition, thathe arrived there before the Damosell, who carried the Water, andinformed Master Simon with the whole tricke intended: wherefore,when the Damosell was come, and hee had passed his judgementconcerning the water, he said to her.
2.  No sooner had hee opened the doore, but stich a smell of brimstonecame foorth (whereof wee felt not the least savour before) as madeus likewise to cough and sneeze, being no way able to refraine it.Shee seeing her Husband to bee much moved, excused the matter thus:that (but a little while before) shee had whited certaine linnenwith the smoake of brimstone, as it is a usuall thing to doe, and thenset the Pan into that spare place, because it should not bee offensiveto us. By this time, Herculano had espied him that sneezed, whobeing almost stifled with the smell, and closenesse of the small roomewherein hee lay, had not any power to helpe himselfe, but stillcontinued coughing and sneezing, even as if his heart would have splitin twaine. Foorth hee pluckt him by the heeles, and perceiving howmatter had past, hee saide to her. I thanke you Wife now I see thereason, why you kept us so long from comming into this roome: letmee die, if I beare this wrong at your hands. When his Wife heardthese words, and saw the discovery of her shame; without returningeither excuse or answere, foorth of doores shee ranne, but whither,wee know not. Herculano drew his Dagger, and would have slaine himthat still lay sneezing: but I disswaded him from it, as well inrespect of his, as also mine owne danger, when the Law shouldcensure on the deede. And after the young man was indifferentlyrecovered; by the perswasion of some Neighbours comming in: hee wasclosely conveyed out of the House, and all the noyse quietly pacified.Onely (by this meanes, and the flight of Herculanoes Wife) wee weredisappointed of our Supper, and now you know the reason of my so soonereturning.
3.  The friendly Merchant, and likewise the Ladie, hearing thesewords, wept both bitterly: and after hee had given over speaking,kindely they comforted him, with promises and solemne Vowes, that ifhee dyed, all should be performed which hee had requested. Within ashort while after, he departed out of this life, and they gave himverie honourable buriall, according to that Country custome. Whichbeing done, the Merchant dispatching all his affaires at Rhodes, wasdesirous to returne home to Cyprus, in a Carracke of the Catelans thenthere being: mooving the Ladie in the matter, to understand how sheestoode enclined, because urgent occasions called him thence to Cyprus.The Lady made answere, that shee was willing to passe thither withhim, hoping for the love hee bare to deceased Antiochus, that heewould respect her as his Sister. The Merchant was willing to giveher any contentment, but yet resolved her, that under the title ofbeing his Sister, it would be no warrant of securitie to them both.Wherefore, hee rather advised her, to stile him as her husband, and hewould terme her his Wife, and so hee should be sure to defend her fromall injuries whatsoever.
4、  Then I called to minde, that having redelivered the Purse and Girdleto his shee-Messenger, which brought them with lookes sufficient todeclare my discontentment: I called her backe againe, fearing leastshe would keep them to her selfe, and make him beleeve that I hadreceived them (as I have heard such kinde of women use to dosometimes) and in anger I snatcht them from her, and have brought themyou, to the end, that you may give him them againe; and tell him, Ihave no need of any such things, thankes be to heaven and myhusband, as no woman can be better stored then I am. Wherefore goodFather, purposely am I now come to you, to let him know, that if hewill not abstaine from thus molesting me, I will disclose it to myHusband, Father, and Brethren, whatsoever befall. For I had ratherhe should receive the injury, then I to be causelessly blamed for him;wherein good Father tell me, if I dooe not well. With manycounterfet sobbes, sighes, and teares these words were delivered;and drawing foorth from under her gowne, a very faire and richpurse, as also a Girdle of great worth, she threw them into the Friarslappe.
5、  Neverthelesse, as womens wits are alwayes best upon suddenconstraints, looking forth of her window, and espying her Husbandpreparing to come up: she threw her selfe on her day Couch, speakingthus (earnestly) to Lambertuccio. Sir, if ever you loved mee, andwould have me faithfully to beleeve it, by the instant safety bothof your owne honour, and my life, doe but as I advise you. Forthdraw your Sword, and, with a stearne countenance, threatning death anddestruction: run downe the staires, and when you are beneath, say. Isweare by my best fortunes, although I misse of thee now heere, yetI will be sure to finde thee some where else. And if my Husbandoffer to stay you, or moove any question to you: make no otheranswere, but what you formerly spake in fury. Beside, so soone asyou are mounted on horsebacke, have no further conference with him,upon any occasion whatsoever; to prevent all suspition in him, ofour future intendments.

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网友评论(BCSr74US42354))

  • 葛花 08-04

      A comely youthfull Gentleman of our City, became amorouslyaffected to the Damosell, resorting thither divers times as heetravelled on the way, to expresse how much he did respect her. And sheaccounting her fortune none of the meanest, to bee beloved by soyouthfull a Gallant, declared such vertuous and modest demeanour, asmight deserve his best opinion of her: so that their love grew to anequall simpathy, and mutuall contentment of them both, inexpectation of further effects; he being named Panuccio, and sheNicholletta.

  • 莫安民 08-04

      Gracious company, there is no defect in this Banquet, or more debarsit of the honour it might else have, but onely the presence ofTheobaldo, who having bin continually in your company, it seemes youare not willing to take knowledge of him, and therefore I meane myselfe to shew him. So, uncasing himselfe out of his Pilgrimes clothes,and standing in his Hose and Doublet, to their no little admiration,they all knew him, yet doubted whether it were he, or no. Which heperceiving, he repeated his brethrens and absent kindreds names, andwhat occurrences hapned betweene them from time to time, beside therelation of his owne passed fortunes, inciting teares in the eyes ofhis brethren, and all else there present, every one hugging andembracing him, yea, many beside, who were no kin at all to him.Hermelina onely excepted: which when Aldobrandino saw, he said untoher; How now Hermelina? Why doest thou not welcome home Theobaldo,so kindly as the rest have done?

  • 刘利鹏 08-04

       Upon further conference with his private thoughts, and remorsefullacknowledgement of his heinous offence, which repentance (too late)gave him eyes now to see, though rashnesse before would not permit himto consider; these two extreamities inlarged his dulled understanding.First, he grew fearfull of the friends and followers to murtheredGuardastagno, as also the whole Country of Provence, in regard ofthe peoples generall love unto him; which being two maine andimportant motives, both to the detestation of so horrid an act, andimmediate severe revenge to succeede thereon: he made such provisionas best he could, and as so sodaine a warning would give leave, he Redaway secretly in the night season.

  • 伊维塔·弗罗洛娃 08-04

      The Marquesse whose heart wept bloody teares, as his eyes wouldlikewise gladly have yeelded their naturall tribute; covered allwith a dissembled angry countenance, and starting up, said. Goe,give her a Smocke onely, and so send her gadding. All there presentabout him, entreated him to let her have a petticote, because it mightnot be said, that she who had been his Wife thirteene yeares and more,was sent away so poorely in her Smocke: but all their perswasionsprevailed not with him. Naked in her Smocke, without hose or shoes,bareheaded, and not so much as a Cloth about her necke, to the greatgriefe and mourning of all that saw her, she went home to her oldfathers house.

  • 车俊作 08-03

    {  The Abbesse being very angry; and not understanding what shemeant, frowningly answered. Why how now saucy companion? What vaileare you prating of? Are you so malapert, to bee chatting already? Isthe deed you have done, to be answered in such immodest manner?Isabella not a jot danted by her sterne behaviour, once againe said.Good Madam let me perswade you to sette your vaile right, and thenchide me as long as you will. At these words, all the rest of theNunnes exalted their lookes, to behold what vaile the Abbesse woreon her head, wherewith Isabella should finde such fault, and she herselfe lift up her hand to feele it: and then they all perceyvedplainly, the reason of Isabellas speeches, and the Abbesse saw herowne error.

  • 林虎 08-02

      Madam Philomena having finished her discourse, the Queeneperceiving, that her turne was the next, in regard of the priviledgegranted to Dioneus; with a smiling countenance thus she spake. Nowor never am I to maintaine the order which was instituted when weebegan this commendable exercise, whereto I yeeld with all humbleobedience. And (worthy Ladies) I am to acquaint you with a Novell,in some sort answerable to the precedent, not onely to let you know,how powerfully your kindnesses do prevalle, in such as have a free andgentle soule: but also to dvise you, in being bountifull, where vertuedoth justly challenge it. And evermore, let your favours shine onworthy deservers, without the direction of chaunce or Fortune, whonever bestoweth any gift by discretion; but rashly withoutconsideration, even to the first she blindly meets withall.}

  • 罗星塔 08-02

      Finding his doore to be fast lockt, and he having knockt softlieonce or twice, he spake in this manner to himselfe. Fortune I thankethee, for albeit thou hast made mee poore, yet thou hast bestowed abetter blessing on me, in matching me with so good, honest, and lovinga Wife. Behold, though I went early out of my house, her selfe hathrisen in the cold to shut the doore, to prevent the entrance oftheeves, or any other that might offend us. Peronella having heardwhat her husband sayde, and knowing the manner of his knocke, saidfearfully to Striguario. Alas deare friend, what shall wee doe? I amlittle lesse then a dead Woman: For, Lazaro my Husband is come backeagain, and I know not what to do or say. He never returned in thisorder before now, doubtlesse, hee saw when you entred the doore; andfor the safety of your honour and mine: creepe under this brewing Fat,till I have opened the doore, to know the reason of his so soonereturning.

  • 郎林卿 08-02

      But leave we this, and returne wee backe to vertuous FryarReynard, who falling again& to his former appetites; became an oftenvisitant of his Gossip Agnesia, and now hee had learned such ablushlesse kinde of boldnesse; that he durst be more instant withher (concerning his privie sute) then ever formerly he had bin, yeaeven to solicite the enjoying of his immodest desires. The goodGentlewoman, seeing her selfe so importunately pursued, and FriarReynard appearing now (perhappes) of sweeter and more delicatecomplexion, the at his entrance into Religion: at a set time of hissecret communing with her; she answered him in as apt tearmes, as theyuse to do, who are not greatly sqeamish, in granting mattersdemanded of them.

  • 葛克友 08-01

       She continuing in these wofull lamentations, and the Marinerslabouring all in vaine, because the violence of the tempestencreased more and more, so that every moment they expectedwracking: they were carried (contrary to their owne knowledge) veryneere unto the Isle of Rhodes, which they being no way able toavoyd, and utterly ignorant of the Coast; for safety of their lives,they laboured to land there if possibly they might. Wherein Fortunewas somewhat furtherous to them, driving them into a small gulfe ofthe Sea, whereinto (but a little while before) the Rhodians, from whomChynon had taken Iphigenia, were newly entred with their ship. Nor hadthey any knowledge each of other, till the breake of day (which madethe heavens to looke more clearly) gave them discovery of being withina flight shoote together. Chynon looking forth, and espying the sameship which he had left the day before, hee grew exceedingsorrowfull, as fearing that which after followed, and therefore heewilled the Mariners, to get away from her by all their best endeavour,and let fortune afterward dispose of them as she pleased; for into aworse place they could not come, nor fall into the like danger.

  • 钟润霞 07-30

    {  The Mariners employed their very utmost paines, and all proved butlosse of time: for the winde was so sterne, and the waves soturbulent, that still they drove them the contrary way: so thatstriving to get forth of the gulfe, whether they would or no, theywere driven on land, and instantly knowne to the Rhodians, whereofthey were not a little joyfull. The men of Rhodes being landed, ranpresently to the neere-neighbouring Villages, where dwelt diversworthy Gentlemen, to whom they reported the arrivall of Chynon, whatfortune befell them at Sea, and that Iphigenia might now berecovered againe with chastisement to Chynon for his bold insolence.They being very joyfull of these good newes, took so many men asthey could of the same Village, and ran immediately to the Sea side,where Chynon being newly Landed and his people, intending flightinto a neere adjoyning Forrest, for defence of himselfe and Iphigenia,they were all taken, led thence to the Village, and afterwards tothe chiefe City of Rhodes.

  • 吴行 07-30

      Amongst these Merchants thus communing together, there was a youngproper man, named Ambroginolo of Placentia, who began to laugh atthe last prayses which Bernardo had used of his Wife, and seeming tomake a mockerie thereof, demaunded, if the Emperour had given him thispriviledge, above all other married men? Bernardo being somewhatoffended, answered: No Emperour hath done it, but the especiallblessing of heaven, exceeding all the Emperours on the earth in grace,and thereby have received this favour; whereto Ambroginolo presentlythus replyed. Bernardo, without all question to the contrary, Ibeleeve that what thou hast said, is true; but (for ought I canperceive) thou hast slender judgement in the Nature of things:because, if thou diddst observe them well, thou couldst not be of sogrosse understanding. For, by comprehending matters in their truekinde and nature, thou wouldst speake of them more correctly then thoudoest. And to the end, thou mayest not imagine, that we who havespoken of our Wives, doe thinke any otherwise of them, then as welland honestly as thou canst of thine, nor that any thing else didurge these speeches of them, or falling into this kinde ofdiscourse, but onely by a naturall instinct and admonition, I wilproceede familiarly, a little further with thee, uppon the matteralreadie propounded. I have evermore understoode, that man was themost noble creature, formed by God to live in this World, and woman inthe next degree to him: but man, as generally is beleeved, and as isdiscerned by apparant effects is the most perfect of both. Having thenthe most perfection in him, without all doubt, he must be so muchthe more firme and constant. So in like manner, it hath beene, andis universally graunted, that Woman is more various and mutable, maybe approved by and the reason thereof may be approved by many naturallcircumstances, which were needlesse now to make any mention of. If aman then be possessed of the greater stability, and yet cannotcontaine himselfe from condiscending, I say not to one thatentreates him, but to desire any other that please him; and beside, tocovet the enjoying of his owne pleasing contentment (a thing notchancing to him once in a moneth, but infinite times in a dayesspace). What can you then conceive of a fraile Woman, subject (bynature) to entreaties, flatteries, giftes, perswasions, and a thousandother inticing meanes, which a man (that is affected to her) canuse? Doest thou thinke then that she hath any power to containe?Assuredly, though thou shouldest rest so resolved, yet cannot I beof the same opinion. For I am sure thou beleevest, and must needesconfesse it, that thy wife is a Woman, made of flesh and blood, asother women are: if it be so, she cannot bee without the same desires,and the weaknesse or strength as other women have, to resistnaturall appetites as her owne are. In regard whereof, it is meerelyimpossible (although she be most honest) but she must needs doe thatwhich other Women doe: for there is nothing else possible, either tobe denied or affirmed to the contrary, as thou most unadvisedly hastdone.

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