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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘维林 大小:SZUQlAfJ51256KB 下载:uz3gejhH41865次
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日期:2020-08-05 08:15:22
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哈罗德

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  It came to passe, that in this time of his spending nothing, butmultiplying daily by infinite meanes, that a civill honest Gentleman(a Courtier of ready wit, and discoursive in Languages) came toGeneway, being named Guillaume Boursier. A man very farre differingfrom divers Courtiers in these dayes, who for soothing shamefull andgracelesse maners in such as allow them maintenance, are called andreputed to bee Gentlemen, yea speciall favourites: whereas much moreworthily, they should be accounted as knaves and villaines, beingborne and bred in all filthinesse, and skilfull in every kinde ofbasest behaviour, not fit to come in Princes Courts. For, whereas inpassed times, they spent their dayes and paines in making peace,when Gentlemen were at warre or dissention, or treating on honestmarriages, betweene friends and familiars, and (with lovingspeeches) would recreate disturbed mindes, desiring none butcommendable exercises in Court, and sharpely reprooving (like Fathers)disordred life, or ill actions in any, albeit with recompencelittle, or none at all; these upstarts now adayes, employ all theirpaines in detractions, sowing questions and quarrels betweene oneanother, making no spare of lyes and falshoods. Nay which is worse,they wil do this in the presence of any man, upbraiding him withinjuries, shames, and scandals (true or not true) upon the veryleast occasion. And by false and deceitful flatteries and villanies oftheir owne inventing, they make Gentlemen to become as vile asthemselves. For which detestable qualities, they are better belovedand respected of their misdemeanored Lords, and recompenced in morebountifull maner, then men of vertuous carriage and desert. Which isan argument sufficient, that goodnesse is gone up to heaven, andhath quite forsaken these loathed lower Regions, where men are drownedin the mud of all abhominable vices.
2.  Then, remembring her owne case, and her poore affrighted friend, wholay in such distresse under the Hen-coope; she began to advise herHusband, that he would be pleased to go to bed, because the nightpassed on apace. But Pedro, having a better will to eate, then tosleepe, desired her to let him have some meate, else hee must goe tobed with an empty bellie; whereto shee answered. Why Husband (quothshee) doe I make any large provision, when I am de. bard of yourcompany? I would I were the Wife of Herculano, seeing you cannotcontent your selfe from one nights feeding, considering, it is nowover-late to make any thing ready.
3.  Never exercise thy malice upon a poore weake woman, for the Eagledisdaineth to pray on the yeelding Dove: and therefore in meere pitty,and for manhoods sake, be my release from open shame and reproch.
4.  Why am I thus restrainde?
5.  My Lord, when Ghinotto was yonger then now he is, he studyedPhysicke, and he commanded me to tell you, that the very bestmedicine, he could ever learne, against any disease in the stomacke,was this which he had provided for your Lordship, as an especialpreparative, and which he should finde to be very comfortable. TheAbbot, who had a better stomacke to eate, then any will or desire totalke: although hee did it somewhat disdainfully, yet hee eate up boththe toastes, and roundly dranke the Glasse of Bastard. Afterward,divers other speeches passed betweene them, the one still advisingin Phisicall manner, and the other seeming to care little for it:but moved many questions concerning Ghinotto, and earnestly requestingto see him. Such speeches as savoured of the Abbots discontentment,and came from him in passion; were clouded with courteousacceptance, and not the least signe of any mislike: but assuring hisLordship, that Ghinotto intended very shortly to see him, and sothey parted for that time.Nor returned he any more, till the next morning with the like twotoastes of bread, and such another Glasse of white Bastard, as hehad brought him at the first, continuing the same course for diversdayes after: till the Abbot had eaten (and very hungerly too) a prettystore of dryed Beanes, which Ghinotto purposely, (yet secretly) hadhidden in the Chamber. Whereupon he demaunded of him (as seeming to beso enjoyned by his pretended master) in what temper he found hisstomacke now? I should finde my stomacke well enough (answered theLord Abbot) if I could get forth of thy masters fingers, and then havesome good food to feed on: for his medicines have made me so soundlystomackt, that I am ready to starve with hunger.
6.  The servant departing from her with the child, and reporting theMarquesse what his Lady had said; he wondered at her incomparableconstancy. Then he sent it by the same servant to Bologna, to anhonourable Lady his kinsewoman, requesting her (without revealingwhose child it was) to see it both nobly and carefully educated.

计划指导

1.  The young Gentleman having heard these protestations made by hisMother, was not a little ashamed of his owne follie; butrecollecting his better thoughts together, and knowing in his soule,that no one could better further his hopes, then shee; forgettingall his former feare, he returned her this answere; Madam, and mydearely affected Mother, nothing hath more occasioned my loves sostrict concealement, but an especiall errour, which I finde by dailyproofe in many, who being growne to yeeres of grave discretion, doenever remember, that they themselves have bin yong. But because hereinI find you to be both discreet and wise, I will not onely affirme whatyou have seen in me to be true, but also will confesse, to whom it is:upon condition, that the effect of your promise may follow it,according to the power remaining in you, whereby you onely maysecure my life.
2.  After that Madame Eliza had made an end of her Song, which sheesealed up with an heart-breaking sigh: they all sate amazedlywondering at her moanes, not one among them being able toconjecture, what should be the reason of her singing in this manner.But the King being in a good and pleasing temper, calling Tindaro,commaunded him to bring his Bagge-pipe, by the sound whereof theydanced divers daunces: And a great part of the night being spent inthis manner, they all gave over, and departed to their Chambers.
3.  Wit, who hath rob'd thee of thy rare invention?
4.  MAY MAKE USE OF HIS ABSOLUTE POWER AND AUTHORITY, TOWARDS MAIDES
5.  A thousand times and more were the chaste ladies moved to laughterby Dioneus's novel, so much were his phrases to their liking. Andthe Queen perceiving that as his tale was ended, her office hadexpired, took the crown of laurel from her head and graciouslyplaced it on the head of Philostratus, saying: "Now we shall seewhether the wolf will rule the sheep better than the sheep ruled thewolves." At this Philostratus laughed, and retorted: "If I had my way,the wolves would have taught the sheep to put the Devil in Hell, noless well than Rustico taught Alibech. Since we did not, call us notwolves, for ye were no sheep. Howbeit, I will reign as best I may,seeing ye have laid the trust on me."
6.  My Gracious Lord (quoth Madame Aemillia) it had bene a matter highlypleasing to mee, that any other (rather then my selfe) should havebegun to speake of this argument, which it hath pleased you to apoint.But seeing it is your Highnesse pleasure, that I must make a passageof assurance for all the rest; I will not be irregular, becauseobedience is our cheefe Article. I shall therefore (Gracious Ladies)strive, to speake something, which may bee advantageable to youheereafter, in regard, that if other women bee as fearfull as we,especially of Spirits, of which all our sexe have generally bintimorous (although, upon my credite, I know not what they are, norever could meete with any, to tell me what they be) you may, by thediligent observation of my Novell: learne a wholsome and holyprayer, very availeable, and of precious power, to conjure and drivethem away, whensoever they shall presume to assault you in any place.

推荐功能

1.  Alas courteous Gentleman, in an unblessed houre came my Ladyesbrother hither yesternight, inflicting too much trouble upon us, and agrievous time of affliction to you. But I am not ignorant, that youbeing vertuous, and a judicious Scholler, have an invincible spirit ofpacience, and sufficient understanding withall; that what this nightcould not affoord, another may make a sound amends for. This I can anddare sufficiently assure you, that nothing could be more displeasingto my Lady, neither can she well be quieted in her mind: untill shehave made a double and treble requitall, for such a strange unexpectedinconvenience, whereof she had not the very least suspition.
2.  Numberlesse Love suites whispred in mine eare,
3.  Ah my dearest Love, I am utterly undone, because the Shippecontaining the rest of mine expected Merchandises, is taken by thePyrates of Monago, and put to the ransome of tenne thousand Florinesof Gold, and my part particularly, is to pay one thousand. At thisinstant I am utterly destitute of money, because the five hundredFlorines which I received of you, I sent hence the next daie followingto Naples, to buy more cloathes, which likewise are to be sent hither.And if I should now make sale of the Merchandizes in my Magazine(the time of generall utterance being not yet come) I shall not make apennyworth for a penny. And my misfortune is the greater, because I amnot so well knowne heere in your City, as to find some succour in suchan important distresse; wherfore I know not what to do or say.Moreover, if the money be not speedily sent, our goods will be carriedinto Monago, and then they are past all redemption utterly.
4.  To cheare my long dismay:
5.   It will be (to morrow) fifteene dayes, since we departed from theCity of Florence, to come hither for our pastime and comfort, theconservation of our lives, and support of our health, by avoydingthose melanchollies, griefes and anguishes, which we beheld dayliein our City, since the pestilentiall visitation beganne there, wherein(by my judgement) we have done well and honestly. Albeit some lightNovels, perhaps attractive to a little wantonnes, as some say, and ourjoviall feasting with good cheare, singing and dancing, may seemematters inciting to incivility, especially in weake and shallowunderstandings. But I have neither seene, heard, or knowne, anyacte, word, or whatsoever else, either on your part or ours, justlydeserving to be blamed: but all has bin honest, as in a sweete andhermonious concord, such as might well beseeme the communitie ofBrethren and Sisters; which assuredly, as well in regard of you, asus, hath much contented me.
6.  Constance continuing thus in the old Ladies service at Susa, andthought to be dead or lost in her owne Fathers house; it fortuned,that one reigning then as King of Thunis, who named himselfeMariabdela: there was a young Lord of great birth, and very powerfull,who lived as then in Granada, and pleaded that the Kingdome ofThunis belonged to him. In which respect, he mustred together a mightyArmy, and came to assault the King, as hoping to expell him. Thesenewes comming to the eare of Martuccio Gomito, who spake the BarbarianLanguage perfectly; and hearing it reported, that the King of Thunismade no meane preparation for his owne defence: he conferred withone of his keepers, who had the custody of him, and the rest takenwith him, saying: If (quoth he) I could have meanes to speake with theKing, and he were pleased to allow of my counsell, I can enstructhim in such a course, as shall assure him to win the honor of thefield. The Guard reported these speeches to his Master, whopresently acquainted the King therewith, and Martuccio being sent for;he was commanded to speake his minde: Whereupon he began in thismanner.

应用

1.  "Your complaints doe proceed, rather from furie then reason, and(with continuall murmurings, or rather seditions) slander,backe-bite and condemne Gisippus, because (of his owne free will andnoble disposition) hee gave her to be my Wife, whom (by your election)was made his; wherein I account him most highly praiseworthy: andthe reasons inducing mee thereunto, are these. The first, because hehath performed no more then what a friend ought to doe: And thesecond, in regard he hath dealt more wisely, then you did. I have nointention, to display (at this present) what the sacred law ofamitie requireth, to be acted by one friend towards another, itshall suffice mee onely to informe you, that the league offriendship (farre stronger then the bond of bloud and kinred)confirmed us in our election of either at the first, to be true,loyall and perpetuall friends; whereas that of kinred, commeth onelyby fortune or chance. And therefore if Gisippus affected more my life,then your benevolence, I being ordained for his friend, as Iconfesse my selfe to be; none of you ought to wonder thereat, inregard it is no matter of mervaile.
2.  I am not able to expresse their counterchanges of courtesie,Saladine commanding him to be cloathed in Royall garments, andbrought into the presence of his very greatest Lords, where havingspoken liberally in his due commendation, he commanded them tohonour him as himselfe, if they expected any grace or favour from him,which every one did immediatly, but (above all the rest) those twoBaschaes, which accompanied Saladine at his house. The greatnesse ofthis pompe and glory, so suddenly throwne on Signior Thorello, madehim halfe forget all matters of Lomberdie; and so much the rather,because he had no doubt at all, but that his letters, were safely cometo the hands of his Uncle.
3.  Gracious Lord, I wonder not a little at your speeches, and so muchthe greater is my admiration, because no man els can be subject to thelike, in regard I have knowne you from the time of your infancy;even to this instant houre, and alwayes your carriage to bee one andthe same. I could never perceive in your youthfull dayes (when loveshould have the greatest meanes to assaile you) any such oppressingpassions: which is now the more novell and strange to me, to heareit but said, that you being old, and called the Aged; should be growneamorous, surely to me it seemeth a miracle. And if it appertained tome to reprehend you in this case, I know well enough what I could say.Considering, you have yet your Armour on your backe, in a Kingdomenewly conquered, among a Nation not knowne to you, full of falsehoods,breaches, and treasons; all which are no meane motives to care andneedfull respect. But having now wone a little leisure, to rest yourselfe a while from such serious affaires; can you give way to the idlesuggestions of Love? Beleeve me Sir, it is no act becomming amagnanimious King; but rather the giddy folly of a young braine.
4、  When he was come into the house, she bashfully demanded of him, ifhe was not named Antigonus of Famagosta, because she knew one like himso called? He answered that he was so named: saying moreover, Madam methinkes I should know you, but I cannot remember where I have seeneyou, wherefore I would entreat (if it might stand with your goodliking) that my memory might be quickned with better knowledge of you.The Lady perceiving him to be the man indeed, weeping incessantly, shethrew her armes about his necke, and soone after asked Antigonus(who stood as one confounded with mervaile) if he had never seeneher in Alexandria? Upon these words, Antigonus knew her immediately tobe Alathiella, daughter to the great Soldane, who was supposed (longsince) to be drowned in the Sea: and offering to do her such reverenceas became him, she would not permit him, but desired that he would beeassistant to her, and willed him also to sit downe awhile by her.
5、  My Gracious Lord (quoth Madame Aemillia) it had bene a matter highlypleasing to mee, that any other (rather then my selfe) should havebegun to speake of this argument, which it hath pleased you to apoint.But seeing it is your Highnesse pleasure, that I must make a passageof assurance for all the rest; I will not be irregular, becauseobedience is our cheefe Article. I shall therefore (Gracious Ladies)strive, to speake something, which may bee advantageable to youheereafter, in regard, that if other women bee as fearfull as we,especially of Spirits, of which all our sexe have generally bintimorous (although, upon my credite, I know not what they are, norever could meete with any, to tell me what they be) you may, by thediligent observation of my Novell: learne a wholsome and holyprayer, very availeable, and of precious power, to conjure and drivethem away, whensoever they shall presume to assault you in any place.

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网友评论(A6BTG2Qu10059))

  • 党文婷 08-04

      PERILLOUS MISFORTUNES

  • 蔡酒哥 08-04

      Ancilla came jocondly home with her answere, and a conclusion wasset downe for their meeting together at Santa Lucia del prato, whichaccordingly was performed, in very solemne conference between them.Her fond affection had such power over her, that shee had forgot, intowhat peril she brought his life, by such an unnatural nightwalke:but disclosed all her other intention to him, how loth she was to loseso deare a friend, and desiring him to exercise his utmost height ofskil, with large promises of her manifold favours to him, wheretoour Scholler thus replyed.

  • 刘琨 08-04

       Gracious ladies, it may be you have not heard how the Devil is putin Hell. Therefore, and since it will not be far off the subject ofthis day's discourse, I will tell it you. Perhaps, hearing it, you maythe better understand that albeit Love more affects gay palaces andluxurious bowers than the cabins of the poor, yet he by no meansdisdains to manifest his power even in the depths of the forest, onstark mountains and in the caves of the desert; and thus we mustacknowledge that all things wheresoever they be are subject to him.

  • 郝飞 08-04

      Pedro being no lesse joyfull for thus find. him, then his Wife wassorrowfull, tooke him by the hand, and brought him into the Parlour,where shee sate trembling and quaking, as not knowing what to say inthis distresse. Seating himselfe directly before her, and holdingthe youth still fast by the hand, thus hee began. Oh Wife! What bitterspeeches did you use (even now) against the Wife of Herculano,maintaining that shee had shamed all other women, and justlydeserved to be burned? Why did you not say as much of your selfe?Or, if you had not the heart to speake, how could you bee so cruellagainst her, knowing your offence as great as hers? Questionlesse,nothing else urged you thereto, but that all women are of one andthe same condition, covering their owne grosse faults by farreinferiour infirmities in others. You are a perverse generation,meerely false in your fairest shewes.

  • 帕丁森 08-03

    {  O So raigne Love, to mee

  • 严丽 08-02

      Giosefo also relating, wherefore he came thither; the Kingreplying onely thus: Goe to the Goose Bridge: and presently Giosefohad also his dismission from the King. Comming forth, he found Melissoattending for him, and revealed in what manner the King had answeredhim: whereupon, they consulted together, concerning both theiransweres, which seemed either to exceed their comprehension, or elsewas delivered them in meere mockery, and therefore (more then halfediscontented) they returned homeward againe.}

  • 默特萨克 08-02

      Amarigo, who beleeved that his Daughter and her Child were alreadydead, was the wofullest man in the World, for his so rashproceeding, knowing very well, that if she were not dead, the scandallwould easily be wipt away with credit. Wherefore he sent in allpoast haste, to the place where his Daughter lay, that if hiscommand were not already executed, by no meanes to have it done atall. He who went on this speedy errand, found there SigniorAmarigoes servant standing before Violenta, with the Cup of poysonin the one hand, and the drawne Rapier in the other, reproaching herwith very foule and injurious speeches, because she had delayed thetime so long, and would not accept the one or other, striving (byviolence) to make her take the one. But hearing his Masters command tothe contrary, he left her, and returned backe to him, certifying himhow the case stood.

  • 黄栗树 08-02

      Not long since, there lived in Naples, an honest meane man, whodid take to Wife, a fayre and lustie young Woman, being namedPeronella.-He professing the Trade of a Mason, and shee Carding andSpinning, maintained themselves in a reasonable condition, abating andabounding as their Fortunes served. It came to passe, that acertayne young man, well observing the beauty and good parts ofPeronella, became much addicted in affection towardes her: and byhis often and secret sollicitations, which he found not to beunkindely entertayned; his successe proved answerable to his hope,no unindifferencie appearing in their purposes, but where her estateseemed weakest, his supplies made an addition of more strength.

  • 波切蒂诺 08-01

       But of all those rich and sumptuous Beds (if pride of mine owneopinion do not deceive me) them two provided for Buffalmaco and me,had hardly any equall: he having the Queene of France as his Ladyand Mistresse, and I, the renowned Queene of England, the onely twochoise beauties of the whole World, and wee appeared so pleasing intheir eyes, as they would have refused the greatest Monarkes on theearth, rather then to bee rejected by us. Now therefore, you mayeasily consider with your selfe, what great reason we have to livemore merrily, then any other men can doe: in regard we enjoy thegracious favour of two such Royall Queenes, receyving also from them(whensoever wee please to commaund them) a thousand or two thousandFlorines at the least, which are both truly and duly sent us. Enjoyingthus the benefit of this high happinesse, we that are companions ofthis Society, do tearme it in our vulgar Language, The Pyrats voyageto Corsica. Because, as Rovers or Pyrats robbe and take away thegoodes of such as they meete withall, even so do we: only thereremaineth this difference betweene us, that they never restore whatthey have taken: which we do immediately afterward, whether it berequired or no. And thus Master Doctor, as to my most endeered friend,I have now revealed the meaning of sayling to Corsica, after themanner of our private Pyracie, and how important the close retentionof the voiage is, you are best able your selfe to judge: In whichregarde, remember your Oathes and faithfull promises, or else I amundone for ever.

  • 吴忠梅 07-30

    {  Moreover, in some apt and convenient place of thy house, theremust be a forge or furnace erected, framed in decent and formallfashion, and neere it a large table placed, ordered in such sort, asstanding upright on feete, and leaning the reines of thy backe againstit; thou must stande stedfastly in that manner every night, withoutthe least motion or stirring, untill the breake of day appeareth,and thine eyes still uppon the Furnace fixed, to keepe ever in memory,the true order which I have prescribed. So soone as the morning isseene, thou mayest (if thou wilt) walke, or rest a little upon thybed, and afterward go about thy businesse, if thou have any. Then goto dinner, attending readily till the evenings approch, preparing suchthings as I will readily set thee downe in writing, without whichthere is not any thing to bee done; and then returne to the same taskeagaine, not varying a jot from the course directed. Before the time befully expired, thou shalt perceive many apparant signes, that thestone is still in absolute forwardnesse, but it will bee utterlylost if thou fayle in the least of all the observances. And when theexperience hath crowned thy labour, thou art sure to have thePhilosophers stone, and thereby shalt be able to enrich all, and workewonders beside.

  • 吉村土吉 07-30

      No sooner were they arrived, but Pasimondo, the intended Husband forIphigenia (who had already heard the tydings) went and complained tothe Senate, who appointed a Gentleman of Rhodes named Lysimachus,and being that yeere soveraigne Magistrate over the Rhodians, to gowell provided for the apprehension of Chynon and his company,committing them to prison, which accordingly was done. In this manner,the poore unfortunate lover Chynon, lost his faire Iphigenia, havingwon her in so short a while before, and scarsely requited with so muchas a kisse. But as for Iphigenia, she was royally welcommed by manyLords and Ladies of Rhodes, who so kindely comforted her, that shesoone forgotte all her greefe and trouble on the Sea, remaining incompany of those Ladies and Gentlewomen, untill the day determined forher marriage.

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